The Prophets

In this work at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal artists Richard Ibghy and Marilou Lemmens cleverly and meticulously constructed scale versions of data visualizations taken from academic journals, and in doing so explores how economics seeks to represent the world through labour, profit, productivity, and consumption.

 

Making Scientific Communication Work

In the Spring 2018 issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review, author Elizabeth Good Christopherson and colleagues argue that new approaches to scientific communication are needed. When faced with public doubt or misunderstanding, Christopherson argues, scientists should roll up their sleeves and engage with audiences in a bi-directional dialogue about their communication preferences, including paying more attention to subtle behavioural influences, such as message framing.

Read the article

 

Co-Design For Health: From Inclusion To Equity

What exactly is co-design, what does ‘involvement’ really entail, and which projects are best-suited to co-design? Through a brief overview of co-design for health, I, along with Pivot Design Group team members Ian Chalmers and Pam Sethi, set out to provide an answer to these questions and more.

Read More

 

Politics & Design Method

"Design tools and methods are thus never, as most toolkits and models claim, value-neutral, but always arrive laden with political and cultural baggage" - Ahmed Ansari's post on the politics of design methods often overlooked by design professionals and those who use design tools alike.

Read more.

 

Jim Goldberg: Rich and Poor

This weekend I had the chance to check out Jim Goldberg's Rich and Poor project at the Ryerson Image Centre. From 1977 to 1985 the artist worked with both affluent and impoverished residents of San Francisco's Bay area to highlight the growing divide between residents, often with raw self-reflection and insight.